• Students

    Students

Current Fellows

2017 Guy Harvey Scholars

Ducharme-Barth

Nicholas Ducharme-Barth

Nicholas Ducharme-Barth is a Ph.D. student in the fisheries and aquatic sciences program within the University of Florida’s School of Forest Resources and Conservation. He is using spatial information associated with the Vessel Monitoring System data to gain a better understanding of the commercial reef fish fishery in the Gulf of Mexico. His career goal is to be a stock assessment scientist and help provide scientific advice to ensure the continued sustainability of marine resources.


Meaghan Faletti

Meaghan Faletti

Meaghan Faletti is a master’s student studying marine science in the Marine Resource Assessment Program at the University of South Florida College of Marine Science. She is investigating the movement of hogfish in the Gulf of Mexico as they age from juveniles to adults. In her career, she would like to continue studying fish ecology research to help fisheries managers better understand interactions between fish and their environment, increase knowledge and protection of essential fish habitats, and better advise ecosystem-based management approaches.


Elizabeth Herdter

Elizabeth Herdter

Elizabeth Herdter is a Ph.D. student in the Marine Resource Assessment Program at the USF’s College of Marine Science. She is evaluating age structure, growth patterns and abundance of spotted seatrout young-of-the-year, or those fish born within the past year. Herdter, who has previously worked as a stock assessment fisheries biologist for the Ocean Conservancy said her ultimate career goal is to work as an assessment scientist for a state or federal agency.


Bryan Keller

Bryan Keller

Bryan Keller is pursuing a Ph.D. in biological oceanography at Florida State University. He is studying the spatial ecology and seasonal migrations of coastal sharks. Before beginning his Ph.D. program, the certified scuba diver worked as a scientific director at Global Eco Adventures, and as a team member for the Bimini Biological Field Station in the Bahamas. After completing his Ph.D., he hopes to secure a post-doctoral position with a state agency to conduct fishery-based research.


Brian Moe

Brian Moe

Brian Moe is a Ph.D. student studying biological science at Florida State University. His dissertation is focused on filling in information gaps regarding the life history and population dynamics of deep-water shark species. To do this, he is also evaluating the use of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as a non-lethal method to age sharks. He intends to pursue a career in either academia at a research first university or a career with a  government agency focusing on fisheries stock assessment.


Cheston Peterson

Cheston Peterson

Cheston Peterson is a Ph.D. student studying biological science at Florida State University. He is studying how medium-sized predators make decisions about how to move and where to go based on the locations of their prey and predators. After he graduates, he plans to either pursue a career in federal fisheries management or in academia doing work related to marine fisheries ecology.


2017 Aylesworth Scholars

James Conrad

James Conrad is a Ph.D. student studying biology at the University of South Florida. He is studying why the human pathogen Vibrio vulnificus, which is found in warm coastal waters and is known to accumulate in shellfish, is capable of causing disease in some environments at certain times of the years, but not others. To do this, he is researching whether modifications to the genetic material of the organism contribute to the harmfulness of Vibrio, which is sometimes mistakenly referred to as “flesh-eating bacteria.”


Devon Pharo

Devon Pharo is a master’s student in the fisheries and aquatic sciences program within the University of Florida’s School of Forest Resources and Conservation. He is studying how algal blooms might affect stone crabs in Florida Bay. He is also investigating how stone crabs use chemical cues to navigate, and find food and shelter in the hard-bottom communities they inhabit.


2017 Chuck Skoch Scholar

Kelly van Woesik

Kelly van Woesik

Kelly van Woesik is a senior at Satellite High School. Van Woesik’s award-winning project focused migration patterns of great white sharks in the Atlantic Ocean.Van Woesik has been accepted into the Florida Institute of Technology, where she plans to pursue a degree in oceanography and obtain her scientific diver certification.


2016 Florida Outdoor Writers Association Scholars

hannah brown

Hannah Brown

Hannah Brown is a Ph.D. student studying interdisciplinary ecology at the University of Florida. After earning her bachelor’s degree in psychology from the New College or Florida, she went on to complete a master’s degree in mass communication from the University of Florida. Her dissertation research aims to improve communication between researchers conducting oyster reef restoration around the state. When she isn’t working on her dissertation, she is writing news stories and managing social media for UF’s School of Natural Resources and Environment. In her free time, Brown hosts a YouTube cooking show, Vegan Cooking with Hannah Brown and is co-editor of a blog, called The Renaissance Woman. Brown has previously worked as a professional journalist for publications including the Gainesville Sun, the Lake City Reporter and the Sarasota Herald-Tribune.


abigail engleman

Abigail Engleman

Abigail Engleman is a Ph.D. student studying marine conservation biology at Florida State University. For her dissertation, she is studying the human impacts on coral reefs and how to conduct tourism sustainably. The experienced scuba diver, never gets bored of the “blue frontier.” Engleman hopes to spend her career as a scientist, and as a writer, telling some of her research and ocean-related stories. She recently worked as an intern in NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries helping to craft education and outreach materials. As part of her internship, she wrote a magazine article about NOAA’s Blue Star sustainable tourism program which is set to be published in Dive Training  magazine later this summer. Engleman earned her bachelor’s degree in marine science from the University of South Carolina.


robert roemer

Robert Roemer

Robert Roemer, a monthly columnist for Coastal Angler magazine, is an M.S. student studying marine affairs and police at the University of Miami. Before starting his master’s degree, he worked as a shark management and policy specialist for NOAA’s Highly Migratory Species Division and as a fisheries technician for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. For his master’s thesis, he is investigating the role humans play on the movements of sharks.To help communicate shark science, he started his own research blog that showcases new and timely research from around the world. But, recently he has shifted his focus to writing articles and managing social media for his lab’s blog instead. Roemer also serves as the outreach event coordinator for Beneath the Waves, Inc., an organization that aims to raise awareness about marine issues through video. He holds a bachelor’s degree in marine science from Coastal Carolina University.


2017 Florida Sea Grant Scholars

Erica Ross

Erica Ross

Erica Ross is a Ph.D. student in the fisheries and aquatic sciences program in the University of Florida’s School of Forest Resources and Conservation, and a 2015 Guy Harvey Scholar.  Her dissertation research is looking at how climate change will impact the transmission of  PaV1, a virus that infects juvenile spiny lobsters. Upon graduation, Ross, who is also an aspiring yoga teacher, hopes to pursue a career with a conservation organization doing research and outreach work.


Abigail Engleman

Abigail Engleman

Abigail Engleman is a Ph.D. student studying biological science at Florida State University, and a 2016 Florida Outdoor Writers Association scholar.  With her scholarship, she will be using 3D printing technology to create coral reef ‘prosthetics’ that can repair physically degraded reefs. These ‘prosthetics’ are generated by scanning coral and printing out a new ‘replicate coral,’ using same material as natural coral and can be added to reefs, providing immediate habitat and encouraging more coral growth in the future. Engleman, who has previously worked as an intern in NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries helping to craft education and outreach materials, hope to pursue a career that combines her love of science and communication.


Bryan Keller

Bryan Keller

Bryan Keller is a Ph.D. studying biological oceanography at Florida State University. He is studying the spatial ecology and seasonal migrations of coastal sharks. His intrigue with migration has led him to determine what mechanism sharks are using to facilitate their navigational success. Keller, who has interned at the Bimini Biological Field Station in the Bahamas, hopes to pursue a career with a state or federal agency and be involved in the formation of new environmental policies.


Conor MacDonnell

Conor MacDonnell

Conor MacDonnell is a Ph.D. student studying soil and water science at the University of Florida. For his dissertation research, he is studying the effects of artificial structures on seagrass in the Indian River Lagoon. The goal of his research is to see if artificial seagrass, integrated with live grass, can reduce herbivory by fish through association resistance. He explains this is when the fish bites into the fake seagrass, hates it, and associates the fake grass with the real bed, giving living seagrass a better shot at survival. MacDonnell said he’s open to a variety of future careers, but hopes to find a job that makes the largest restorative impact on our ecosystems.


Devon Pharo

Devon Pharo

Devon Pharo is a master’s student in the fisheries and aquatic sciences program in the University of Florida’s School of Forest Resources and Conservation. Cyanobacteria blooms have a major impact on hard-bottom habitat in the Florida Keys and could have negative effects on the condition of the stone crabs inhabiting these impacted areas. For his master’s research, Pharo is studying how these algal blooms might affect the ecology and biology of stone crabs in Florida Bay. Pharo has also worked as a research technician monitoring Caribbean spiny lobsters for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and for Don Behringer’s lab at the University of Florida.


2017 Knauss Marine Policy Fellows

adrian mahoney

Adrian Mahoney

Adrian Mahoney recently graduated from the University of Florida Levin College of Law Conservation Clinic where he earned a certificate in land use and environmental law. Mahoney received his bachelor’s degree in environmental science from the University of Florida and has completed an internship with the Tropical Audubon Society, where he worked on the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Project. While in law school, he conducted legal research on issues associated with water law, land use law and environmental restoration as a legal clerk for the Everglades Foundation. In Washington he will be working for the NOAA Research Office of the Assistant Administrator, where he will collaborate with senior leaders to support science dealing with climate, weather, oceans and coasts.


brendan talwar

Brendan Talwar

Brendan Talwar is a recent graduate of Florida State University, where he earned his master’s degree in biological science. For his graduate research, he investigated the mortality rate of deep-sea bycatch species, such as sharks, after being caught on longlines or in traps. Talwar earned his bachelor’s degree in biology from Furman University. Since then, he worked as a research assistant for many organizations including the Shark Research and Conservation Program in the Bahamas, the Shark Bay Ecosystem Research Project in Australia and the Belize Marine Research and Education Center. He has also served as an instructor for a tropical island ecology field course at Monmouth University and a marine science education instructor for FSU’s Sea-to-See program. In Washington he will serve as the communications and policy analyst for the Marine Mammal Commission, an independent government organization that provides scientific information about human impacts on marine mammals and their ecosystems.


Nature Coast Biological Station/Florida Sea Grant Scholar

Hannah Brown

Hannah Brown

Hannah Brown is a Ph.D. student studying interdisciplinary ecology at the University of Florida. Her dissertation research is focused on oyster restoration projects along the Gulf Coast and how various stakeholders involved in those projects communicate and network. She says the goal of her project is to assess how the knowledge about restoration projects, held by oyster growers, coastal managers and scientists, is shared between groups to make recommendations for future efforts.