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  • sgef205 slide 8

    In addition to providing value for wildlife, mangroves, beaches and dunes also help protect homes and inland habitats from storm damage.

  • sgef205 slide 7

    Estuaries, where fresh water, often from rivers, enters semi-enclosed bodies of salt water, are some of our most productive ecosystems. Oysters, clams, shrimp, and many other species of marine vertebrates and invertebrates thrive in estuarine waters, as do the myriad bird species that prey upon them.

  • sgef205 slide 6

    Coastal forests, commonly containing oaks, pines, and/or palms, provide habitat for upland species like this scrub jay and other such as the red cockaded woodpecker, white tailed deer, and pine snake.

  • sgef205 slide 5

    Beaches and dunes are home to threatened species such as the marsh rabbit, beach mice, snowy plovers, and gopher tortoises, and provide nesting sites for shorebirds and sea turtles.

  • sgef205 slide 4

    Many commercially and recreationally valuable species of fish like this redfish or spotted seatrout, tarpon and snook depend on sea grass, mangroves, or salt marsh for part or all of their life cycles.

  • sgef205 slide 3

    Seagrass, mangroves, salt marshes, beaches, dunes, coastal forests and estuaries are important coastal ecosystems. Each provides breeding and nursery grounds, food, and cover for a wide variety of animals.

  • sgef205 slide 2

    Sea-level rise may have significant effects on Florida’s coastal ecosystems. These ecosystems are the foundation upon which much of Florida’s natural beauty and economy are based. Understanding what changes may happen in the future can help us plan for those changes and, to the extent possible, lessen the impacts of those changes.

  • sgef205 slide 1

    Sea-level rise is already having an effect in Florida. Subtle, and not so subtle, changes are being noticed especially by people who live, work and play at the coasts.

  • Do not walk on dunes

    Conserve beach plants and animals. You'll find lots of colorful and attractive plants growing along our coast. Don't pick them. They are essential for wildlife habitat and for holding beaches together.

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    When boating, avoid shallow water where the boat's propeller can disturb habitat of bottom dwellers, observe speed limits in no wake zones, repair all fuel and oil leaks promptly.

  • Dirty water

    Floridians put about 7 million gallons of oil into the environment each year by pouring it down storm drains, tossing it in the garbage, or simply dumping it into the ground. Collect used oil and antifreeze and take them to a collection center, garage or recycling center. Use only non-phosphate detergents to wash your car, and wash your car in the grass so soap is not washed into the storm system.

  • Sprinkler

    If you use automatic sprinklers, install a soil moisture sensor and water your lawn only as often as needed. Adjust sprinklers to reduce runoff from the yard. Don't allow sprinklers to put water on driveways or sidewalks.

  • Clean up the coast

    Get involved and clean the coast during the International Coastal Cleanup. Each year on the third Saturday in September, more than 10,000 Floridians volunteer for a one-day cleanup of the Sunshine State's coastline.

  • Practice Estuary-Safe Yard Care

    Choose the right plants for your location--they will use less fertilizer and water. If you need fertilizer, use it sparingly, and use the slow-release type. Contact your extension agent for safe alternatives to pesticides.

  • Think Before Pouring

    Think before you pour household cleaners, paint or prescription medicine down the drain. It all ends up in the water.

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A Primer on the Tools and Concepts of Social Marketing for Environmental Behavior Change

Instructor: Paul Monaghan, Ph.D.
Date: Monday, May 14, 2012
Time: 1:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: Clearwater Community Sailing Center (adjacent to the conference hotel)
Cost: $10
Max enrollment: 25
Contact: Bob Swett

Many organizations promoting conservation and environmental sustainability are turning to social marketing to help understand and actively change the behaviors of the public. But what is social marketing? Is it just advertising with a socially responsible message? This half-day workshop will provide educators, environmental outreach coordinators, and conservation managers with an introduction to social marketing, its methodology, and its success stories.

At the end of the workshop, participants will:

  • Recognize the FOUR Ps of Product, Price, Placement, and Promotion.
  • Know what it means to “think like a marketer.”
  • Understand the most common tools of social marketing such as audience segmentation, focus group research, and materials pre-testing.
  • Have confidence in their ability to work with a social marketing team or to hire a professional.
  • Be motivated to continue their training and will encourage training within their institution in the social marketing methodology.

 

Instructor Bio: Paul Monaghan is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Agricultural Education and Communication, University of Florida. He specializes in community-based social marketing (CBSM) and training Extension agents in the use of the methodology for water and natural resources conservation. From 2002-2008, he directed the Partnership for Citrus Worker Health (PCWH), a pilot project of the Florida Prevention Research Center which was funded by the CDC that applied social marketing to agricultural labor issues. Prior to that experience, he was a researcher with the Together for Agricultural Safety (TAS) project, which also linked academic researchers in public health at UF with the farmworker community in central Florida. In addition to his interests in social marketing and engaging communities for environmental and social change, he has extensive experience conducting anthropological research in Haiti.

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