Water quality sampling volunteer

Florida Water Watch Helps Communities Monitor Their Waterbodies

Since 2014, UF/IFAS Extension Florida Sea Grant agents have engaged citizen scientists to help gather data that managers need to evaluate coastal waters. Agents train citizens in agency-approved water quality-testing protocols and provide them with the equipment they need. While the data cannot be used for regulatory purposes, it provides researchers and managers a higher resolution view of trends…

Private: Fisheries and Conservation in the Coral ECA: A Stakeholder Process

Public Input Needed For Southeast Coral Reef Ecosystem Conservation Area

By: Lourdes Rodriguez, 954-577-6363 office, 954-242-8439 mobile, rodriguezl@ufl.edu FLORIDA – Florida’s coral reef ecosystems are at a critical state of vulnerability and in need of conservation efforts. Of much concern is the Southeast Coral Reef Ecosystem Conservation Area, also referred to as the Coral ECA, the northernmost part of Florida’s reef tract stretching from the…

New Document Helps Measure Benefits of Living Shorelines

Living shorelines use natural materials like sand, oysters, and marsh grass to protect coastal property from erosion and to promote ecosystem health and improved water quality. UF/IFAS Sea Grant agents and affiliate researchers have created a series of documents that describe how living shorelines function, what their benefits are, as well as permitting and installation…

oyster restoration project

Potential Economic Benefits of Restoring Commercial Oyster Harvest Levels in Apalachicola Bay, Florida

By: Susan K Gildersleeve, EDIS editor, UF/IFAS Communications, (352) 294-3318, skgilder@ufl.edu Florida’s Apalachicola Bay has long been known for its oyster harvesting and processing industry, but a steady decline in oyster landings in the Bay has threatened the industry. The complex nature of the human and natural systems that together affect Apalachicola’s oyster reefs has…

FFWCC awards UF/IFAS Florida Sea Grant $92K to create communication plan alerting public of expected Florida red tide events

FORT PIERCE, Fla. – Harmful algal blooms (HABs) of the toxin-producing dinoflagellate Karenia brevis occur regularly within the Gulf of Mexico. Despite the frequency of these red tide events and the amount of publicly available information, there persists a gap in knowledge about the organism itself, management actions, and the real and perceived health risks to Florida’s residents and tourists.   …