Apalachicola Bay Oyster Situation Report

This report summarizes efforts conducted through the University of Florida Oyster Recovery Team, in collaboration with various stakeholders, to describe conditions in Apalachicola Bay prior to and after a historic collapse of the oyster fishery. The report characterizes conditions in the bay, reviews possible causes for the fishery collapse, and outlines a plan for future…

Tackling the Oyster Collapse in Apalachicola Bay

Responding to the oyster fishery collapse in Apalachicola Bay, experts with the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences and Florida Sea Grant are joining forces with local seafood producers to find ways of restoring sustainable populations of the area’s world-famous oysters. Apalachicola, a heritage fishing community in the Big Bend region off…

Operation Drag and Snag

Despite the importance of the blue crab fishery to Florida’s coastal communities, derelict blue crab traps are a growing problem. In recent years, however, awareness of the impact derelict traps have on marine life, the environment and public safety has increased. In May 2011, Charlotte County Sea Grant Extension Agent Betty Staugler began a project…

Scallop Research and Restoration

Scallops live about one year before either dying off naturally or being eaten by humans, crabs, octopuses, or a variety of shell-crushing fish. They spawn primarily in the fall. After about a two-week period as plankton, larvae develop a small shell and settle onto seagrass blades. They continue to grow while attached to the grass…