Operation Drag and Snag

Despite the importance of the blue crab fishery to Florida’s coastal communities, derelict blue crab traps are a growing problem. In recent years, however, awareness of the impact derelict traps have on marine life, the environment and public safety has increased. In May 2011, Charlotte County Sea Grant Extension Agent Betty Staugler began a project…

Scallop Research and Restoration

Scallops live about one year before either dying off naturally or being eaten by humans, crabs, octopuses, or a variety of shell-crushing fish. They spawn primarily in the fall. After about a two-week period as plankton, larvae develop a small shell and settle onto seagrass blades. They continue to grow while attached to the grass…

Scallop Searches

Volunteer scallop searches are part of Florida’s efforts to restore bay scallop populations. These are no-take outings conducted in areas presently closed to scalloping. Volunteers snorkel and search for scallops, recording the numbers to help monitor and document the health and status of returning scallop populations. While the numbers may vary from year-to-year, it’s most important…

Protecting Florida's Spiny Lobster

As commercial and recreational landings of Florida’s spiny lobsters continue to remain below historical levels, new findings about the lobster’s ecology are helping guide management strategies to benefit future populations and the fishing industry. Spiny lobsters are one of the largest commercial fisheries in Florida, and one of the most economically valuable in the Caribbean.…

The 2010 Great Goliath Grouper Count

UPDATE (October 2010) — The results of the count are in! A total of 312 goliath grouper were counted, an average of 5.3 fish per site. The information tended to agree with other work that has shown that more goliath grouper are found on high relief structure such as shipwrecks and concrete pilings and culvert.…